Category Archives: Advertising

What We Value

Iconoculture, a global consumer research and advisory firm, has conducted research ranking the most important values shared across life stages in North America, Europe, South America and Asia/Pacific global regions.

Some key insights they identify are:

  1. Loyalty, success, honesty, courtesy and equality are top ranking values of North Americans, regardless of age. Meanwhile Latin Americans most value loyalty, authenticity, equality, sustainability and reliability.
  2. Europeans’ top value set includes loyalty, courtesy, authenticity, honesty, and sustainability. Consumers in Asia/Pacific regions value success, health, authenticity, comfort, and sustainability.
  3. Authenticity and sustainability are among the top values for everyone except for North Americans.

Given the Occupy movement across the US, I found it interesting those who valued equality the least are the very young, those in middle age and seniors.

Brain Bugs, Behavior & Boehner

In his book Brain Bugs: How the Brain’s Flaws Shape Our Lives neuroscientist Dean Buonomano gives some fascinating reasons for why our memory, beliefs and behavior are subject to serious flaws…even if we’re unaware of it.  Simply put, our brain evolved for a different time and place.  He uses the example of a skunk’s effective defense mechanism: When attacked they turn around, lift their tails and spray.  Very effective for scaring off a coyote, not so much against an oncoming car.

It’s somewhat comforting to know that there’s an evolutionary bias (i.e. I can’t help it) for eating naughty food and blowing my budget when I know these behaviors aren’t helpful.  So my brain’s operating system is outdated. Is there an upgrade?

Luckily there is: behavioral priming.  Buonomano cites an NYU study using word puzzles to illustrate how we create “behavior nodes”.  In the study,  subjects were asked to complete word puzzles.  Some had to come up with words associated with kindness while others had puzzles with words biased toward being rude.  After finishing this task, subjects were told to talk to a research assistance pretending to be on the phone.  In measuring how long each subject waited before interrupting the on-going phone conversation, it was found that those who completed puzzles using more rude words waited less time to interrupt the phone conversation.

If the words, images, and sounds surrounding us constantly influence our thoughts and actions,  what are we subjecting ourselves to on a regular basis?

How often are we bombarded with images of war, famine and Beohner?

More importantly, how do we prime our brains to turn it off without turning away?

Schools as a Brand

Just this week I noticed an interesting Next!: urban charter school start-ups leveraging a well-known brand, in these cases, famous athletes.

This leaves me wondering: Will schools be marketed to kids like cereal?  In their efforts to attract students will charter schools, already serving a disproportionate number of low-income students, fall into a de facto means of school segregation?